Latest pre-press release “School’s must be at the centre of their communities”: Race and educational attainment and opportunity in Haringey, Tottenham, London

Although some countries refuse to listen, for those that do, the results (over 2 countries and more) are incredible -Education International (EI).

Latest News 27th March International summit meeting for equal opportunity in education

The Research Summary:

The Research: Education (The new Progress 8 system) and the implications of statistics: Additional Needs, Teaching well being and student well being, NEET, and Social Care to determine race and educational attainment and opportunity examined in Haringey, Tottenham.

This paper has used political/social/economic research from the civil rights division of Clinton’s government (1993), to suggest that given Haringey’s seat is under the representation of David Lammy, labour MP Tottenham and specifically Haringey can be used as vital research to determine how race implicates the measures 1). teacher well-being, 2). student well-being and the Progress 8 system, 3). Addittional Needs, funding, 4). NEET and 5). Social Care (the alarming rise in care leavers in the last year 2017-2018). Education International, OECD, Leading trade union leaders from leading education performing countries, ministers, senior civil servants and teachers, raised these issues particularly teacher and student well-being have agreed are key issues that need to be raised to 6). Promote equitable educational outcomes as teacher well-being and community welfare is being increasingly recognised to have a direct correlation to student well being.

Education International’s reports of school’s being at the centre of the communities they represent to quell this, this paper looks specifically at race as a determinant of educational attainability and opportunity by looking at the Progress 8 in accordance to teacher well being and student well being, (NEET), social care and the rise in care leavers which has been noted as ‘alarming’ by trade unionists and Addittional Needs in relevance to having been noted by Dr Mazenod UCL to also include the false impression of ’challenging behaviour’ specifically within the community of Tottenham, Haringey.

Using these 5 measures: Progress 8 and 1. teacher well being, 2 student well being 3. Additional/Challenging Needs, funding 4. NEET 5. Social care and rise in care leavers in the last year 2017-2018 we can determine how race implicates student attainability and opportunity in Haringey, Tottenham. This is achieved by correlating these measures to research carried out by the American governments civil rights division 1993, to educational attainability and opportunity where a representative of a black voting area stands. The summit agrees that schools must be at the centre of their communities to quell this issue which has not yet been solved with finance investment and therefore requires campaigning. I trust that Educational iNternational and associates can find a campaign that takes these factors into consideration to divide programmes to encourage education, training and employment in HARINGEY as Haringey has the highest budget for health and social care this NEET statatistics and rising financial pressures have been examined as having. High impact on educational attainability and opportunity in haringey. Apprenticeships is key perhaps (?) but we also require youth engagement: a hub would be ideal, where we can provide SEETEC support, for employment and training. (Please see reference Joseph and myself at Chestnut’s Community Centre, St Ann’s road. But also, most significantly as a primary measure: healthy sport and social engagement to promote well being of key stage 4 -25 years of age.

Mr John Bangs, Senior consultant at Education International (EI) has highlighted on 27th March 2018 that as teacher well-being is being increasingly recognised to have a direct correlation to student well-being, Mr John Bangs has highlighted on 27th March 2018: “If you haven’t already done so, in partnership with teacher unions, start looking at practical strategies which will provide the conditions for enhancing teacher well-being. And above all buy into identifying the causes of teacher stress and strategies for getting rid of it… schools must be at the centre of their communities to promote more ‘equitable educational outcomes’.

Senior consultant of Education International (EI) reports ‘schools must be at the centre of the communities they represent (Tuesday 27th March 2018). Although some countries refuse to listen, research from 2 different countries and more proves that for those that do the results can be incredible. Apart from 1). teacher well-being, 2). grouping student’s into ability-based sets, 3). Additional Needs and the other issues that are relevant to Haringey include 4). long-term key stage 4 pupils who have been out of education, training or employment for one year (NEET) and 5). health and social care (Haringey’s largest government budget) have been examined in this paper to 6). Determined the implications of race and more equitable educational outcomes.

The Progress 8 academic record takes a mean average of primary school records to secondary school, and based on records of prior academic attainment takes a mean average of all the students within each of those 1-8 ability-based sets. Are there factors that guarantee winners and losers (?) alongside interviews with teachers, to understand how grouping students into ability-based sets influenced lower attaining students, UCL research finds that 70% of teachers changed their teaching methods according to students’ prior attainment.

Leading UCL research finds that 600 maths and English teachers across 82 UK secondary schools find prior academic attainment and grouping students in ability-based groups has a damaging ‘culture of dependency on teachers’ and on student’s future attainability and progress and opportunity after education. Dr Anna Mazenod says that the findings suggested that students in the so-called lower ability-based sets may be unintentionally encouraged to remain more dependent on their teachers in comparison with their peers in higher ability-based sets.

Dr Mazenod pointed out that teachers tended to perceive lower ability-based set students as more ‘dependent learners’ and may not build in scope to allow for students to develop their independent learning skills. This could hinder lower ability-based students in making the most of learning opportunities in their ongoing education, as independence was a key component of successful learning. The research finds that students in lower ability-based sets typically face a reduced curriculum based on more structural, repetative tasks, and more one-to-one time with teachers. Teachers of the pupils were often reluctant to risk over-stretching ability-based sets by teaching overly complex content. It is closely linked to teachers’ expectations of pupils in lower ability-based sets being linked to the belief that student behaviour in lower ability-based sets would be more challenging.

Paul Whitman, general secretary of NAHT, argues figures are at ‘absolute breaking point’: Only 8% of schools said they could foresee a year without untenable deficit, 71% of schools have to set a deficit budget in the next financial year, and 79% of schools are expecting a deficit budget in the following year. 37% of schools had to reduce the number or hours of teaching staff, and this has most affected those with ‘additional needs.’

Universities have further leaked documents warning of plans to cut courses by a third (Open University, Lydia Richards, UCU regional Official, Tuesday March 27th 2018). 30,000 key stage 4 pupils have spent the past 1 year out of education, employment or training, long term (NEET) (pp.336). Stephen Evans, CEO of Learning and Work Institute has said that this matches his evidence of the figures of long term care leavers which is becoming alarming.

Although government policy does have the scope, support was often ‘patchy’, Stephen Evans argues that a more ‘joined up and concerted’ effort was required so that all young carers could receive the help that they need. As teacher well-being is being increasingly recognised to have a direct correlation to student well-being, schools must be at the centre of their communities to promote more ‘equitable educational outcomes’.

Most alarming in Haringey in particular, is the sharp discord between incredibly high ability-based sets and low ability-based sets, which informs a fairly avereage borough Progress 8 report. As increasing numbers of less able-based set pupils are held back how do we rise above these factors as determinants of educational attainment and opportunity?

At the International Summit for Education on the 27th March 2018, Education International, OECD, Leading trade union leaders from leading education performing countries, ministers, senior civil servants, teachers, raised well-being as being increasingly recognised to have a direct correlation to student well-being; schools must be at the centre of their communities to promote more ‘equitable educational outcomes’ the summit reports.

The Progress 8 academic record takes a mean average of primary school records to secondary school: based on records of prior academic attainment it takes a mean average of all the students within each of those 1-8 ability-based sets. Are there factors that guarantee winners and losers (?) alongside interviews with teachers, to understand how grouping students into ability-based sets influenced lower attaining students, UCL research finds that 70% of teachers changed their teaching methods according to students’ prior attainment.

Leading UCL research finds that 600 maths and English teachers across 82 UK secondary schools find prior academic attainment and grouping students in ability-based groups has a damaging culture of dependency on teachers. Dr Anna Mazenod says that the findings suggested that students in the lower ability-based sets may be unintentionally encouraged to remain more dependent on their teachers in comparison with peers in a higher ability-based set. Dr Mazenod pointed out that teachers tended to perceive lower ability-based set students as more ‘dependent learners’ and may not build in scope to allow for students to develop their independent learning skills. This could hinder lower ability-based students in making the most of learning opportunities in their ongoing education, as independence was a key component of successful learning. The research finds that students in lower ability-based sets typically face a reduced curriculum based on more structural, repetative tasks, and more one-to-one time with teachers. Teachers of the pupils were often reluctant to risk over-stretching ability-based sets by teaching overly complex content. It is closely linked to teachers’ expectations of pupils behaviour in lower ability-based sets to be more challenging.

Paul Whitman, general secretary of NAHT, argues figures are at ‘absolute breaking point’: Only 8% of schools said they could foresee a year without untenable deficit, 71% of schools have to set a deficit budget in the next financial year, and 79% of schools are expecting a deficit budget in the following year. 37% of schools had to reduce the number or hours of teaching staff, and this has most affected those with ‘additional needs.’

Most alarming in Haringey in particular, is the sharp discord between incredibly high ability-based sets and low ability-based sets, which informs a fairly average borough Progress 8 report. As increasing numbers of less able-based set pupils are held back how do we rise above these factors as determinants of educational attainment and opportunity?

Universities have further leaked documents warning of plans to cut courses by a third (Open University, Lydia Richards, UCU regional Official, Tuesday March 27th 2018). 30,000 key stage 4 pupils have spent the past 1 year out of education, employment or training, long term (NEET) (pp.336). Stephen Evans, CEO of Learning and Work Institute has said that this matches his evidence of the figures of long term care leavers which is becoming alarming. Government policy does have the scope, but support was often ‘patchy’, Stephen Evans argues that a more ‘joined up and concerted’ effort was required so that all young carers could receive the help that they need.

Local and national government statistics and research on grade attainability and opportunity, evidence from educational trade unions and the civil rights department reveals that educational attainability and opportunity can be determined by wealth and gender, wealth can therefore enhance the educational attainability of gender and vice versa but educational opportunity cannot be determined by wealth and race, race is persistent and requires more investment.

Professor Lani Guinier of Pennsylvania Law School and assistant attorney for Clinton’s civil rights division (1993) argues that educational attainability, opportunity and political salience are inextricably linked to race. Gunier proves through political campaiging and demographic research that because race is ‘too often an important factor’ in the 1). construction of voting districts, that as a result, this influences 2). outcome of elections 3). political influence 4). control of some educational systems. Although some countries refuse to listen, for those that do the results can be incredible reports. Because literary texts inform law and culture, and in turn racial discourse, this means racial discourse informs a ‘racially appropriate’ legal system. What this means is that a more ‘joined up and concerted’ effort is required to set a more diverse system of educational attainability, opportunity and political salience, to reflect a diverse ’racially appropriate’ legal system.

At the International Summit for Education on the 27th March 2018, Education International, OECD, Leading trade union leaders from leading education performing countries, ministers, senior civil servants and teachers, raised teacher well-being as being increasingly recognised to have a direct correlation to student well-being; schools must be at the centre of their communities to promote more ‘equitable educational outcomes’ the summit reports.

Mr John Bangs, Senior consultant at Education International (EI) has highlighted on 27th March 2018 that as teacher well-being is being increasingly recognised to have a direct correlation to student well-being, Mr John Bangs has highlighted on 27th March 2018: “If you haven’t already done so, in partnership with teacher unions, start looking at practical strategies which will provide the conditions for enhancing teacher well-being. And above all buy into identifying the causes of teacher stress and strategies for gettinng rid of it… schools must be at the centre of their communities to promote more ‘equitable educational outcomes’.

Senior consultant of Education International (EI) reports ‘schools must be at the centre of the communities they represent (Tuesday 27th March 2018). Although some countries refuse to listen, research from 2 different countries and more proves that for those that do the results can be incredible. Apart from 1). teacher well-being, 2). grouping student’s into ability-based sets, and the other issues that are relevant to Haringey include 3). long-term key stage 4 pupils who have been out of education, training or employment for one year (NEET) and 4). health and social care (Haringey’s largest government budget) have been examined in this paper to 5). Promote more equitable educational outcomes.

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