Nature News: November 1 -November 7

The Sulphur-tuft (Agarieus fascicularis)

From, Edith Holden, 1906

‘ there are great numbers of British Toadstools which are edible and which are exceedingly nutritious as an article of diet, but in Britain the Mushroom is almost the only fungus eaten, although abroad Toad-stools are eaten in great quantities’.

November 1. ‘Steady drizzle of rain, -a regular November day.

November 3. Cold and foggy in the morning, bright sunshine later. I brought home a little book on British Toad-stools today, with photographs of 65 different varieties. I was disappointed not to find my beautiful scarlet, spotted toad-stool among them. In the afternoon I went to the Violet-wood to see how many different kinds I could discover. It was quite hot in the sun, and the autumn foliage looked beautiful in the warm afternoon light. In about half an hours time I found 10 different species of fungus, growing in the wood and adjoining field ; -all brown in colour, with the exception of two, -One of these was the common Sulphur-Tuft; -a rich orange and yellow, this kind is found growing plentifully among dead wood, the other was dull pink above, and a beautiful pale helio=trope beneath. I only found one clump of these; -one or two of them very large in size. There are some interesting notes at the end of the toad-stool book; one of which describes the formation of the Toad-stools and Mushroom plants:

‘…The plant itself is composed of a number of minute threads, which run in all directions under-ground; -and it is only when the plant growing in the ground, becomes vigorous enough to produce seeds or spores that Mushrooms appear. It will thus be seen that the Mushroom, the sole function of which is to produce spores is only the fruit of the Mushroom plants…’

In another note the author states, that there are great numbers of British Toadstools which are edible and which are exceedingly nutritious as an article of diet, but in Britain the Mushroom is almost the only fungus eaten, although abroad Toad-stools are eaten in great quantities’.

From, Edith Holden, 1906.

The Sulphur-tuft (Agarieus fascicularis), photo from photonatura.org

Common Polyporus (Polyporus versicolor)

Stags Horn (Fungi)

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